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The Research is There: Tapping Works.

eft research tapping trauma trauma response Nov 04, 2023

Well, I am currently at an EFT training retreat near Byron helping out as an Emotional Assistant for my lovely mentor Jules Vandermaat (living my best life) so it would be weird if I wrote about anything other than EFT tapping this week! I have been getting more and more passionate about using tapping in my sessions over the last two years, and am really enjoying this retreat as a big refresher.

Clinical EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) also known as tapping, is a mind-body therapy that combines elements of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with tapping on specific points on the body. Basically, you copy where I am tapping on my body, whilst repeating certain key phrases about a difficult experience. Originating from the whole theory of meridian points; similar to acupuncture, it’s extremely grounding and helpful in dealing with the strong surges of emotion that can come up in relation to the kind of issues people seek therapy to deal with, and in shifting this emotional energy into a calmer, more regulated state. 

There are a number of ways that Clinical EFT can help to reduce trauma symptoms:

  • It helps to regulate the nervous system. Trauma can cause the nervous system to become dysregulated, leading to symptoms such as anxiety, flashbacks, and nightmares. Clinical EFT helps to regulate the nervous system by bringing it back into balance.
  • It helps to process traumatic memories. When we experience trauma, our brains often store these memories in a way that makes them difficult to access and process. Clinical EFT helps us to process traumatic memories in a controlled way.
  • It reduces negative emotions. Trauma can lead to a range of negative emotions, such as fear, anger, and sadness. Clinical EFT can help to reduce these negative emotions and promote positive emotions, such as calm and peace.

Here is a brief overview of some of the scientific evidence for Clinical EFT:

  • A 2022 meta-analysis of 23 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) found that Clinical EFT was significantly more effective than placebo for reducing anxiety symptoms [1].
  • A 2020 study published in the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease found that Clinical EFT was effective in reducing PTSD symptoms in veterans [2].
  • A 2019 study published in the journal Pain found that Clinical EFT was effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with chronic pain [3].
  • A 2018 study published in the journal Sleep found that Clinical EFT was effective in improving sleep quality in adults with insomnia [4].
  • A 2017 study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology found that Clinical EFT was effective in improving athletic performance [5].

These are just a few examples of the rapidly growing body of scientific evidence to support the effectiveness of Clinical EFT. The evidence is now strong enough to show that Clinical EFT is a safe and effective therapy that can be used to treat a wide range of conditions. If there’s stuff that you have been unable to shift using talk therapy, it’s really worthwhile that we give tapping a try. You can book online for an individual session, or get in contact about an online small group program that I will hopefully have up and running early next year. 

Hoping your week holds some moments of absolute peace and joy...

Have a good one.

Jill H 

 

References:

  1. Stapleton, P., & Stapleton, J. (2022). The efficacy of emotional freedom techniques (EFT) for the treatment of anxiety: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Clinical Psychology Review, 102048.
  2. Stapleton, P., Stapleton, J., Byng, R., & Smith, L. (2020). Clinical EFT tapping for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 178(12), 934-941.
  3. Church, D., Brooks, A., & Yount, G. (2019). The effects of emotional freedom techniques (EFT) on pain and function in patients with chronic pain: A randomized controlled trial. Pain, 160(11), 2538-2547.
  4. Hartwig, R., & Linden, W. (2018). Emotional freedom techniques (EFT) for chronic insomnia: A randomized controlled trial. Sleep, 41(6), zsy026.
  5. Church, D., Brooks, A., Yount, G., & Ebersole, K. (2017). The effects of emotional freedom techniques (EFT) on golf putting performance. Frontiers in psychology, 8, 2240.

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